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(In Super Smash Bros. Brawl)
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'''Roy''' (ロイ, ''Roi'') is the main playable hero in the sixth installment of the ''[[Fire Emblem (universe)|Fire Emblem]]'' series of tactical role-playing games. Roy was included in ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'' as a playable character for the purpose of "previewing" the sixth game, which was released in Japan after ''Melee'', making him the only character thus far in the ''Smash'' series to be included for that purpose. His appearance in ''Melee'' along with another ''Fire Emblem'' series character, [[Marth]], increased global interest in the general franchise, prompting the series to be released internationally from installment seven onwards.
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'''Roy''' (ロイ, ''Roi'') is the main playable hero in the sixth installment of the ''[[Fire Emblem (universe)|Fire Emblem]]'' series of tactical role-playing games. He was included in ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'' as a playable character for the purpose of "previewing" the sixth game, which was released in Japan after ''Melee'', making him the only character thus far in the ''Smash'' series to be included for that purpose. His appearance in ''Melee'' along with another ''Fire Emblem'' series character, [[Marth]], increased global interest in the general franchise, prompting the series to be released internationally from installment seven onwards.
   
   
 
==Character description==
 
==Character description==
While HAL Laboratory obliged to include [[Marth]] as a playable character in ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'' by popular Japanese demand, the sixth installment of Intelligent Systems' long-running ''Fire Emblem'' fantasy tactical-RPG series, ''[[Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]'' (''Fuuin no Tsurugi''), was nearing the end of its development. [[Masahiro Sakurai]] decided to include that game's main character, Roy, as a playable character in addition to Marth to serve as a preview of the game for Japanese audiences, making Roy the only character in the ''Smash'' series to be featured for that purpose. It was a successful ploy to Japanese audiences for both ''Melee'' and ''The Binding Blade'', but since this involved a game franchise never distributed outside of Japan beforehand, Nintendo was wary of keeping the unfamiliar fantasy swordsmen in ''Melee'' in its North American and European releases, but decided to keep them in based on the approval of western gamers. Roy and Marth, as new and original anime-inspired characters with rather effective fighting abilities, became popular enough in ''Melee'' that the ''Fire Emblem'' franchise gained international attention from the gaming community.
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While HAL Laboratory obliged to include [[Marth]] as a playable character in ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'' by popular Japanese demand, the sixth installment of Intelligent Systems' long-running ''Fire Emblem'' fantasy tactical-RPG series, ''[[Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]'' (''Fuuin no Tsurugi''), was nearing the end of its development. Smash Bros. creator [[Masahiro Sakurai]] decided to include that game's main character, Roy, as a playable character in addition to Marth to serve as a preview of the game for Japanese audiences, making Roy the only character in the ''Smash'' series to be featured for that purpose. It was a successful ploy to Japanese audiences for both ''Melee'' and ''The Binding Blade'', but since this involved a game franchise never distributed outside of Japan beforehand, Nintendo was wary of keeping the unfamiliar fantasy swordsmen in ''Melee'' in its North American and European releases, but decided to keep them in based on the approval of Western gamers.
   
Intelligent Systems followed up with the franchise's seventh installment, subtitled ''"Blazing Sword"'' but whose U.S. version is simply titled "''[[Fire Emblem (game)|Fire Emblem]]''", designed with the international scene in mind rather than Japanese exclusivity. To this end they made it a prequel to ''The Binding Blade'', set in the same ''Fire Emblem'' universe and chronology twenty years before Roy's quest and starring Roy's father Eliwood, whose somewhat older resemblance to Roy was meant to appeal to players of ''Melee''. The game's story is laid out with ten introductory chapters starring one of Eliwood's allies Lyn, meant to introduce players to the ''Fire Emblem'' style of tactical play, and the other 20+ chapters are the main game itself. ''Blazing Sword''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s story is also structured so that knowledge of ''The Binding Blade'' is not required, and if the sixth game were played after the seventh, it would feel like a direct continuation. The game's epilogue features an older Eliwood and Roy as a child, with a plot device inserted at the end to set up Roy's journey in the sixth game, but since the sixth game was never released internationally, players who do not use emulation do not know what will happen with Roy.
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Roy is an upstanding and thoughtful 15-year-old young man in ''The Binding Blade'' with a natural proclivity to help and support others, and while he would prefer to avoid blood-shed, he maintains a strong resolve to see peace return to the continent of Elibe, the medieval high-fantasy setting of both games. Unlike most young protagonists, however, he is perceptive and cunning for his age, such as tricking a traitorous vassal in his group into exposing himself, and he often reacts calmly and tactically to disturbing news. Roy is also quite oblivious to the obvious feelings that some of the women in his army develop for him. Also steeped in series tradition is that his in-game unit is the only one belonging to the Lord character class, giving him initially shaky base stats but allowing him to become a high-performance unit by the game's end.
 
Roy, in the best tradition of ''Fire Emblem'' protagonists, is an upstanding and thoughtful 15-year-old young man in ''The Binding Blade'' with a natural proclivity to help and support others, and while he would prefer to avoid blood-shed, he maintains a strong resolve to see peace return to the continent of Elibe, the medieval high-fantasy setting of both games. Unlike most young protagonists, however, he is perceptive and cunning for his age, such as tricking a traitorous vassal in his group into exposing himself, and he often reacts calmly and tactically to disturbing news. Roy is also quite oblivious to the obvious feelings that some of the women in his army develop for him. Also steeped in series tradition is that his in-game unit is the only one belonging to the Lord character class, giving him initially shaky base stats but allowing him to become a high-performance unit by the game's end.
 
   
 
Roy is studying in the province of Ostia, away from his home province of Pherae, both of which are in the nation of Lycia, when the militant nation of Bern begins to conquer various other nations on the continent; while his father Eliwood turns ill, Roy is called in to lead Pherae's army alongside the other armies of the League of Lycia against Bern and its ruler, Zephiel, who displays a mysterious thirst for world domination. Zephiel's errant younger sister, princess Guinevere, escapes Bern and comes to Roy in defiance of her brother's motives, hoping to negotiating a treaty with Lycian nobility. Roy quickly agrees to her proposal to search for a peaceful means to end Bern’s aggression, and it is in part this encounter that will eventually lead him on a journey across Elibe to save the continent from what could end up being a war with powerful dragons from a different dimension. He is ultimately successful in his endeavors. <!--Could someone put here what actually happens at the end of the game? I don't know what happens. Thanks.-->
 
Roy is studying in the province of Ostia, away from his home province of Pherae, both of which are in the nation of Lycia, when the militant nation of Bern begins to conquer various other nations on the continent; while his father Eliwood turns ill, Roy is called in to lead Pherae's army alongside the other armies of the League of Lycia against Bern and its ruler, Zephiel, who displays a mysterious thirst for world domination. Zephiel's errant younger sister, princess Guinevere, escapes Bern and comes to Roy in defiance of her brother's motives, hoping to negotiating a treaty with Lycian nobility. Roy quickly agrees to her proposal to search for a peaceful means to end Bern’s aggression, and it is in part this encounter that will eventually lead him on a journey across Elibe to save the continent from what could end up being a war with powerful dragons from a different dimension. He is ultimately successful in his endeavors. <!--Could someone put here what actually happens at the end of the game? I don't know what happens. Thanks.-->
   
Roy has not appeared in any game or media since ''The Binding Blade'' and ''Blazing Sword'', but he remains a contender in ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'' competitive play. It is interesting to note that since Fire Emblem games weren't released abroad when ''Melee'' was released, Roy and Marth were not given English voice samples, retaining their Japanese-language taunts and voices in English versions. Some mistakenly believe that Roy and Marth have a storyline connection because of their appearances together in ''Melee'', but there is nothing to suggest that any of the continents depicted in the ''Fire Emblem'' games - FE I, II, III, and XI's Akaneia and Valencia, FE IV and V's Jugdral, FE VI and VII's Elibe, FE VIII's Magvel, and FE IX and X's Tellius - exist in the same world, or in the same universe and chronology. Roy and Marth were a primary subject of the "tier wars" at GameFAQs that lasted between 2003 and 2004, determining which among these two very similar fighters were the better character, and in the end Marth won out over Roy by a very large margin as demonstrated by the current tier list. Roy is nowadays considered an inferior clone of Marth in ''Melee'', and will not return in ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''.
 
   
 
==In ''Super Smash Bros. Melee''==
 
==In ''Super Smash Bros. Melee''==
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[[Image:Roymelee.jpg|120px|right]]Roy makes his ''Smash''-series debut as an unlockable character in ''Melee''. He can be battled to be unlocked one of two ways: beating either Classic or Adventure with [[Marth]] on any difficulty, or playing 900 Vs. mode matches; clearly the first method is incomparably easier than the second.
 
[[Image:Roymelee.jpg|120px|right]]Roy makes his ''Smash''-series debut as an unlockable character in ''Melee''. He can be battled to be unlocked one of two ways: beating either Classic or Adventure with [[Marth]] on any difficulty, or playing 900 Vs. mode matches; clearly the first method is incomparably easier than the second.
   
Roy fights with his sword, the [[Sword of Seals|Binding Blade]], and his B-moves all involve the sword's fiery powers. His B-move, the [[Flare Blade]], is a chargeable sword strike like Marth's Shield Breaker, but it can be charged for up to five full seconds, after which it will unleash an explosive attack so powerful that many opponents would be instantly KO'ed, and Roy receives 10% damage as a side effect. His Smash B, the [[Double-Edge Dance]] (DED), is a series of up to four sword slashes determined by the number of times B is pressed and which direction the control stick is pressed during each swipe, like Marth's Dancing Blade. Roy's Up & B, [[Blazer]], is a slower, more damaging, fire-based version of Marth's Dolphin Slash, and his down-B, [[Counter]], operates like Marth's Counter, but better; the retaliatory sword swipe's power and knockback is based on those of the opponent's attack, multiplied by 1.5, making it very quick at KO'ing a character like [[Ganondorf]] using his Warlock Punch.
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Roy fights with his sword, the [[Sword of Seals|Binding Blade]], and his B-moves all involve the sword's fiery powers. His B-move, the [[Flare Blade]], is a chargeable sword strike like Marth's Shield Breaker, but it can be charged for up to five full seconds, after which it will unleash an explosive attack so powerful that many opponents would be instantly KO'ed, and Roy receives 10% damage as a side effect. His Smash B, the [[Double-Edge Dance]] (DED), is a series of up to four sword slashes determined by the number of times B is pressed and which direction the control stick is pressed during each swipe, like Marth's Dancing Blade. Roy's Up & B, [[Blazer]], is a slower, more damaging, fire-based version of Marth's Dolphin Slash, and his down-B, [[Counter]], operates like Marth's Counter, but better; the retaliatory sword swipe's power and knockback is based on those of the opponent's attack, multiplied by 1.5.
   
Roy is a [[Clone characters|clone]] of Marth in that they feature pretty much the same movement and attack style, but their specifications are different. Roy seems at first to be a slower and stronger version of Marth, but he is actually almost the opposite; he has a fast dash, a fast and long [[dash dance]], and a fast fall that gives speed to his [[Small Jump]] aerials almost as well as Marth, and his DED is very useful in battle, but his moves actually do rather low damage, and it is hard to land his primary killing move, his forward smash. It was determined professionally that Marth can KO better with his swordplay, which has a sweet spot on the tip of the sword, while Roy's sweet spot is more in the middle. Roy's forward Smash and chargeable B are decent at [[edge-guarding]], and Roy has a great grab range like Marth and has a potentially effective move in his Counter, but it is his lack of a projectile, short recovery, and easiness to be juggled and comboed, added with his low general damage, that ultimately make Marth the better fighter. Roy is mainly popular to use in the single-player modes of ''Melee''.
 
 
===In Single-player===
 
Roy does not appear specifically in the game's single-player Adventure mode. He is only featured in two of the Event Matches:
 
*'''[[Event 46: Fire Emblem Pride]]''': Your character battles and must defeat a team of Marth and Roy in an untimed match in the Hyrule Temple stage, with all three characters receiving 3 stock.
 
*'''[[Event 49: All-Star Match Deluxe]]''': Roy is the fifth of six opponents you must fight in this series of staged battles. Your character battles him on the [[Hyrule: Temple]] stage, and your character has 2 stock while Roy has 1. With a timer of four minutes, you must defeat him and the other five characters one-by-one with the overall time and life you have: [[Dr. Mario]], [[Falco]], [[Pichu]], and [[Young Link]] beforehand, and [[Ganondorf]] afterwards.
 
   
 
===Trophies===
 
===Trophies===
By tradition, Roy as a playable character is featured on his personal 3 trophies. His normal trophy is acquired by beating the Classic mode with Roy on any difficulty, and his Smash Red and Smash Blue trophies are acquired the same way by beating the Adventure and All-Star modes, respectively.
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His normal trophy is acquired by beating the Classic mode with Roy on any difficulty, and his Smash Red and Smash Blue trophies are acquired the same way by beating the Adventure and All-Star modes, respectively.
   
 
==='''Japanese Translations'''===
 
==='''Japanese Translations'''===
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*"真の戦いは、これからだ。" "Shin no tatakai wa, korekara da", which translates to "The true fight is after this."
 
*"真の戦いは、これからだ。" "Shin no tatakai wa, korekara da", which translates to "The true fight is after this."
 
*"守るべきもののために、負けられない!" "Mamoru beki mono no tame ni, makerarenai!", which translates to "For those whom I must protect, I will not lose!"
 
*"守るべきもののために、負けられない!" "Mamoru beki mono no tame ni, makerarenai!", which translates to "For those whom I must protect, I will not lose!"
  +
  +
Note: the translations of these victory lines are not official.
   
 
==In ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''==
 
==In ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''==
Roy (along with [[Dr. Mario]], [[Mewtwo]], [[Young Link]], and [[Pichu]]) does not return in ''[[Super Smash Bros. Brawl]]''. Many people say that his spiritual successor is [[Ike]], who is both the main character from the most recent [[Fire Emblem]], and uses fire elemental sword attacks.
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Roy (along with [[Dr. Mario]], [[Mewtwo]], [[Young Link]], and [[Pichu]]) does not return in ''[[Super Smash Bros. Brawl]]''.
   
 
Hacking shows that there is leftover data in ''Brawl'' for Roy. Some take this as signs of a planned character, but it also likely that it was there for referential purposes by the programmers, or the result of imported data from ''[[Super Smash Bros. Melee]]''.
 
Hacking shows that there is leftover data in ''Brawl'' for Roy. Some take this as signs of a planned character, but it also likely that it was there for referential purposes by the programmers, or the result of imported data from ''[[Super Smash Bros. Melee]]''.

Revision as of 03:33, April 4, 2008

For the Metal Gear character, see Roy Campbell. For Roy's fighter info, see Roy (SSBM).

Roy (ロイ, Roi) is the main playable hero in the sixth installment of the Fire Emblem series of tactical role-playing games. He was included in Super Smash Bros. Melee as a playable character for the purpose of "previewing" the sixth game, which was released in Japan after Melee, making him the only character thus far in the Smash series to be included for that purpose. His appearance in Melee along with another Fire Emblem series character, Marth, increased global interest in the general franchise, prompting the series to be released internationally from installment seven onwards.


Character description

While HAL Laboratory obliged to include Marth as a playable character in Super Smash Bros. Melee by popular Japanese demand, the sixth installment of Intelligent Systems' long-running Fire Emblem fantasy tactical-RPG series, Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade (Fuuin no Tsurugi), was nearing the end of its development. Smash Bros. creator Masahiro Sakurai decided to include that game's main character, Roy, as a playable character in addition to Marth to serve as a preview of the game for Japanese audiences, making Roy the only character in the Smash series to be featured for that purpose. It was a successful ploy to Japanese audiences for both Melee and The Binding Blade, but since this involved a game franchise never distributed outside of Japan beforehand, Nintendo was wary of keeping the unfamiliar fantasy swordsmen in Melee in its North American and European releases, but decided to keep them in based on the approval of Western gamers.

Roy is an upstanding and thoughtful 15-year-old young man in The Binding Blade with a natural proclivity to help and support others, and while he would prefer to avoid blood-shed, he maintains a strong resolve to see peace return to the continent of Elibe, the medieval high-fantasy setting of both games. Unlike most young protagonists, however, he is perceptive and cunning for his age, such as tricking a traitorous vassal in his group into exposing himself, and he often reacts calmly and tactically to disturbing news. Roy is also quite oblivious to the obvious feelings that some of the women in his army develop for him. Also steeped in series tradition is that his in-game unit is the only one belonging to the Lord character class, giving him initially shaky base stats but allowing him to become a high-performance unit by the game's end.

Roy is studying in the province of Ostia, away from his home province of Pherae, both of which are in the nation of Lycia, when the militant nation of Bern begins to conquer various other nations on the continent; while his father Eliwood turns ill, Roy is called in to lead Pherae's army alongside the other armies of the League of Lycia against Bern and its ruler, Zephiel, who displays a mysterious thirst for world domination. Zephiel's errant younger sister, princess Guinevere, escapes Bern and comes to Roy in defiance of her brother's motives, hoping to negotiating a treaty with Lycian nobility. Roy quickly agrees to her proposal to search for a peaceful means to end Bern’s aggression, and it is in part this encounter that will eventually lead him on a journey across Elibe to save the continent from what could end up being a war with powerful dragons from a different dimension. He is ultimately successful in his endeavors.


In Super Smash Bros. Melee

As a playable character

Main article: Roy (SSBM)
Roymelee
Roy makes his Smash-series debut as an unlockable character in Melee. He can be battled to be unlocked one of two ways: beating either Classic or Adventure with Marth on any difficulty, or playing 900 Vs. mode matches; clearly the first method is incomparably easier than the second.

Roy fights with his sword, the Binding Blade, and his B-moves all involve the sword's fiery powers. His B-move, the Flare Blade, is a chargeable sword strike like Marth's Shield Breaker, but it can be charged for up to five full seconds, after which it will unleash an explosive attack so powerful that many opponents would be instantly KO'ed, and Roy receives 10% damage as a side effect. His Smash B, the Double-Edge Dance (DED), is a series of up to four sword slashes determined by the number of times B is pressed and which direction the control stick is pressed during each swipe, like Marth's Dancing Blade. Roy's Up & B, Blazer, is a slower, more damaging, fire-based version of Marth's Dolphin Slash, and his down-B, Counter, operates like Marth's Counter, but better; the retaliatory sword swipe's power and knockback is based on those of the opponent's attack, multiplied by 1.5.


Trophies

His normal trophy is acquired by beating the Classic mode with Roy on any difficulty, and his Smash Red and Smash Blue trophies are acquired the same way by beating the Adventure and All-Star modes, respectively.

Japanese Translations

Roy's three victory lines are:

  • "苦しい戦いだった。" "Kurushii tatakai datta", which translates to "It was a difficult fight."
  • "真の戦いは、これからだ。" "Shin no tatakai wa, korekara da", which translates to "The true fight is after this."
  • "守るべきもののために、負けられない!" "Mamoru beki mono no tame ni, makerarenai!", which translates to "For those whom I must protect, I will not lose!"

Note: the translations of these victory lines are not official.

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl

Roy (along with Dr. Mario, Mewtwo, Young Link, and Pichu) does not return in Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Hacking shows that there is leftover data in Brawl for Roy. Some take this as signs of a planned character, but it also likely that it was there for referential purposes by the programmers, or the result of imported data from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Roy's official artwork, pictured above, also appears as a sticker.

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